E. Coli Litigation

A resource for E. Coli Outbreak Legal Cases sponsored by Marler Clark

Marler Clark’s E. coli lawyers developed this site to keep our clients up-to-date on current litigation being prosecuted by Marler Clark throughout the United States. The site is also a resource for Marler Clark co-counsel in E. coli cases, print and broadcast media who are working on stories about E. coli outbreaks and outbreak-related litigation, and potential clients who are researching Marler Clark in anticipation of filing an E. coli claim.

Marler Clark Current Case Updates

E. coli litigation is currently taking place in several states.

  • Chicago Carbon Live Fire E. coli Outbreak and Lawsuits

    The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) identified an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), impacting at least 67 Chicago residents. As part of the CDPH investigation, Carbón Live Fire Mexican Grill located at 300 W. 26th Street has been linked to the outbreak. Following a request from CDPH, Carbón closed voluntarily and is fully cooperating with the investigation. At least 16 individuals have been hospitalized as part of this outbreak. One of the leading symptoms caused by STEC is diarrhea, including bloody diarrhea. Infection can also lead to more serious complications.Marler Clark represents 32 people sickened in this outbreak.

  • Chicken & Rice Guys E. coli Outbreak and Litigation

    An E. coli O157: H7 outbreak that has shuttered three locations of the Chicken & Rice Guys, as well as its fleet of Middle Eastern food trucks, Boston health inspectors said last Tuesday. By Friday the number of ill jumped to 15 with at least 10 people hospitalized. The department confirmed 15 cases of E. coli O157: H7 stemming from the Chicken & Rice Guys Allston location, which supplies food to the chain’s other outposts. The problems led to the suspension of its operating license.

  • Costco Chicken Salad E. coli Outbreak and Lawsuit

    The E. coli Attorneys at Marler Clark represent a seriously sickened young woman in Utah.

    The CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service, and public health officials in several states are investigating an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7) infections.

    A total of 19 people infected with the outbreak strain of Shiga toxin-producing STEC O157:H7 have been reported from 7 states. The majority of illnesses have been reported from states in the western United States. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: California (1), Colorado (4), Missouri (1), Montana (6), Utah (5), Virginia (1), and Washington (1).

    Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from October 6, 2015 to November 3, 2015. Ill people range in age from 5 years to 84, with a median age of 18. Fifty-seven percent of ill people are female. Five (29%) people reported being hospitalized, and two people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

    The epidemiologic evidence available to investigators at this time suggests that rotisserie chicken salad made and sold in Costco stores is a likely source of this outbreak. The ongoing investigation has not identified what specific ingredient in the chicken salad is linked to illness.

  • Federico’s Mexican Restaurant E. coli Lawsuits and Litigation

    The Marler Clark attorneys have filed lawsuits on behalf of E. coli outbreak victims whose illnesses were traced to lettuce used in food sold by Federico’s, a Mexican restaurant located in Litchfield Park, Arizona. 

  • General Mills E. coli O121 E. coli Outbreak and Litigation

    The E. coli Lawyers at Marler Clark represent one of the individual sickened in this outbreak.

    As of June 28, 2016, 42 people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O121 have been reported from 21 states – Alabama 1, Arkansas 1, Arizona 2, California 2 (up 1), Colorado 4, Iowa 1, Illinois, 4, Indiana 1 (New), Massachusetts 2, Maryland 1, Michigan 4, Minnesota 3, Missouri 1, Montana 2 (up 1), New York 1, Oklahoma 2, Pennsylvania 2, Texas 2, Virginia 2, Washington 3 (up 1), and Wisconsin 1.

    Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 21, 2015 to June 8, 2016. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 95, with a median age of 18. Eighty-one percent of ill people are female. Eleven ill people have been hospitalized. No one has developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, and no deaths have been reported.

  • I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew Soy Nut Butter E. coli Lawsuits

    Twenty-nine people infected with the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 have been reported from 12 states. Arizona 4, California 5, Florida 1, Illinois 1, Massachusetts 1, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 9, Virginia, 2, Washington 2, and Wisconsin 1.  Marler Clark E. coli Attorneys represent 17 individual sickened - daily children.

  • Jimmy Johns Cucumber E. coli Outbreak

    On Friday, October 18, 2013, public health investigators at the Colorado Department of Public Health (CDPHE) detected an increase in Denver area patients reported as having E. coli O157.  Preliminary interviews revealed that patients had eaten at Jimmy John’s restaurants and shopped at an area grocery store chain.  CDPHE epidemiologist, Nicole Comstock, noted in an October 22 email sent to county health departments that “at this time we are not ruling any exposures out yet.”  Ms. Comstock encouraged county investigators to interview newly reported patients diagnosed with E. coli O157 promptly using a standardized questionnaire.  By October 23, CDPHE epidemiologists described the association between illness and sandwiches prepared at area Jimmy John’s restaurants “too strong to ignore.”

    CDPHE and their local and federal public health partners conducted case finding, two case control studies (“Study I” and “Study II”), an environmental investigation, produce traceback, and laboratory testing.  Case finding occurred via routine public health surveillance methods.  Case control “Study I” was conducted to assess restaurant exposures reported by case-patients.  Case control “Study II” was conducted subsequently to assess foods consumed at Jimmy John’s.  For “Study II” online and phone order records were used to recruit controls (non-ill Jimmy John’s customers) who purchased food from the same Jimmy John’s locations on the dates as case-patients.

    Eight patients laboratory confirmed with E. coli O157:H7 were identified as outbreak associated cases.  All eight patients were infected with an indistinguishable genetic strain (EXHX01.0074/EXHA26.0569) of E. coli O157 as determined by PFGE and MLVA.  This strain was not seen elsewhere in the United States in October 2014.  One patient was classified as a “probable” case since she was not culture positive for E. coli O157 due to collection of her stool specimen post-antibiotic treatment.  Marler Clark represents one HUS victim.

  • Matador E. coli Lawsuits

    Marler Clark E. coli Attorneys represent three people sickened in this outbreak, including one child that developed acute kidney failure. Seattle King County Public Health is investigating a cluster of five E. coli infections caused by Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (also called STEC) associated with Matador restaurant in Ballard. Four people ate on 8/14 and one person ate on 8/22. Public Health received the first report of illness on 8/22/16 and the most recent case was reported on 9/6/16.  All the people developed symptoms including diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Four people developed bloody diarrhea. Three people had been hospitalized with one person developing a type of kidney injury called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). All five people have recovered.

  • Northwest Washington Fairgrounds E. coli Outbreak and Lawsuits

    The Whatcom County Health Department (WCHD) in Bellingham investigated an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 infections. The Washington State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assisted with the investigation.  Marler Clark filed multiple lawsuits on behalf of sickened children.

    Environmental contamination with E. coli O157:H7 of the Dairy Barn at the Northwest Washington Fairgrounds was the likely source of this outbreak. All of the ill people either attended the Milk Makers Fest between April 21 and 23 at the Northwest Fairgrounds; helped with the event between April 20 and 24; or were close contacts of people associated with the event. Most of the ill people were children, including older children who helped with the event. More than 1,000 children from primary schools in Whatcom County attended the event on these days.

    25 people were confirmed cases.
    9 of these cases were considered secondary cases (the ill person didn’t attend the event but had close contact with someone who did attend).
    No one died.
    10 people were hospitalized.
    6 people developed HUS.

  • PT Farms E. coli Outbreak and Lawsuit

    PT Farm, LLC, a North Haverhill, N.H. establishment, is recalling approximately 8,800 pounds of raw beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced.  Based on epidemiological investigation, 14 case-patients have been identified with illness onset dates ranging from June 15 to July 10, 2016. Most of the 14 illnesses have been reported from New Hampshire (10), with 2 reported from Massachusetts, 1 from Maine, and 1 from Vermont. Traceback for 11 case-patients for whom data was available led back to a single slaughter date at PT Farm. This investigation is ongoing. FSIS continues to work with the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services on this investigation and will provide updated information as it becomes available.  Marler Clark represents one woman sickened in this outbreak.

  • Reno Provisions E. coli Outbreak and Litigation

    Marler Clark E. coli Lawyers represent 10 people sickened in this outbreak.  All lawsuits have been filed.

    An E. coli 0157:H7 outbreak that sickened nearly two dozen people and prompted a popular south-Reno restaurant to voluntarily close has been linked to a dessert food manufactured, sold, and distributed by Reno Provisions according to Health District officials. Since mid-October twenty-one confirmed and probable cases of E. coli 0157:H7 have been reported in Washoe County.